Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Welcome Wednesday!

Do you enjoy reading the list of the latest vessels to enroll in Amver? We enjoy bringing it to you. Listing the new members of the Amver system is a tradition that dates back to the first Amver Bulletins in the late 1950's. We're proud to continue the tradition here. Help us welcome the new members.

  • CAVALIERE GRAZIA
  • GOLAR CELSIUS
  • KITA LNG
  • AET PARTNERSHIP
  • LAUREL ACE
  • NORD GERANIUM
  • SEAFARER
  • STI LEXINGTON
  • SVEVA
  • SARA
  • HOS BLACK ROCK
  • DALARNA
  • SEACOR COURAGEOUS
  • FRONTIER HERO
  • WASHINGTON
Photo credit: Fotolia

Friday, July 18, 2014

Happy Birthday Amver!

Today Amver turns 56 years old! From its humble beginnings as the Merchant Vessel Reporting Program. In fact the first Amver message received in 1958 was from the Dutch liner S.S. Groote Beer (right).

The original mission of Amver, as outlined in the implementation plan, was to establish and maintain a comprehensive and effective merchant ship position reporting system in the North Atlantic Maritime region (as defined in the National Search and Rescue Plan) in order to improve Search and Rescue procedures by:

  • Reducing the time element in search procedures through having available a maximum number of vessel positions for immediate use.
  • Improving the probability of successful rescue through prior position knowledge.
  • Reducing the cost of searches through having previous knowledge of distress vessel and rescue vessel positions which enables better control of M/V and government vessel diversions.
According to the 1964 edition of the Amver brochure, "It is an established fact that several hundred merchant vessels are sailing in the offshore areas of the Atlantic Ocean at any given time". Commercial shipping traffic has increased as well as the number of Amver participants. In fact, more than 30,000 Amver messages are received each day. 

Amver is successful because of the ageless tradition of the sea, that no call for help shall go unanswered. Amver is successful because of you. Thank you for helping save countless lives over the past 56 years. We look forward to many more years of saving lives at sea.

Photo credits: Wikipedia

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Welcome Wednesday!

What if vessels didn't enroll in Amver? Would it make a significant impact on lives lost at sea? According to a recent Amver cost benefit analysis, 25% of all the lives saved at sea are saved by Amver ships and there are approximately 891 lives lost at sea each year. This number doesn't include recreational yachtsmen or migrants. 

You can see that without Amver, a good portion of those in peril at sea would likely die. Help us welcome the latest members of the Amver network, dedicated to ensuring no call for help goes unanswered.
  • YUNG DA FA 101
  • WILLIAM C HIGHTOWER
  • JS GREENSAIL
  • EVER LIBRA
  • FLAG EVI
  • APL MEXICO CITY
  • ORANGE BLOSSOM 2
  • SIEM STINGRAY
  • SIGNET POLARIS
  • MUSKY
  • HAKO
  • AYE EVOLUTION
  • CELSIUS MANILA
  • DEWI LAKSMI
  • KSL SAPPORO
  • NOTORIOUS
  • ZOURVA
Photo credit: Fotolia

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Welcome Wednesday!

Another nine ships enrolled in Amver in the past week. That's nine more opportunities to save a life. If you haven't considered joining Amver think of this. Your ship might be the only difference between a seafarer, yachtsman or migrant living or dying. Help us increase those odds.

  • STENA EUROPE
  • EVER LISSOME
  • OCEAN TURQUOISE I
  • UNITED LEGACY
  • SILVER EMILY
  • EVER LIVEN
  • MORNING SALUTE
  • ANCASH QUEEN
  • GREAT EXPECTATIONS
Photo credit: Fotolia 

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Amver ship rescues sailor from disabled sailboat near Puerto Rico

The Amver participating car carrier Hoegh Kobe rescued a lone sailor from his disabled 42-foot sailboat approximately 280 miles northeast of Puerto Rico on June 10, 2014.

US Coast Guard rescue personnel in San Juan received a call that a commercial ship had spotted a 42-foot sailboat with engine failure and loss of the rudder. The sailor onboard was refusing to disembark the sailboat and declined any assistance from the Amver ship. The sailor requested his situation be relayed to the Coast Guard.

Coast Guard rescue personnel contacted the sailor's family and requested the Amver ship to remain on scene as there were few options for the sailor's rescue if it became necessary. The sailor, realizing the seriousness and convinced by a plea from his family, made the decision to abandon his sailboat and board the Amver ship. The survivor was sailing without an Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon, decreasing his chances of being located if things had worsened.

The 652-foot Singapore flagged Amver ship agreed to transfer the yachtsman in Puerto Rico. A 45-foot Coast Guard boat safely embarked the survivor and transported him to shore where he was met by Border Patrol personnel. He was in good health and uninjured in the rescue and transfer process.

The Hoegh Kobe, managed by Hoegh Autoliners of Oslo, Norway, enrolled in the Amver system on June 16, 2007.

Photo credit: marinetraffic.com

Welcome Wednesday!

Who joined Amver this week? Take a look at the nineteen vessels listed below. They enrolled, knowing their vessel schedule may be delayed; knowing they may have to risk life or limb in the service of other. If your vessel isn't enrolled, consider joining our ranks, won't you?

  • CAP SAN SOUNIO
  • OS HERCULES
  • ASIA VISION
  • HANJIN AMI
  • PACIFIC CONCORD
  • OCEAN RAPTOR
  • MDPL RANDEEP
  • VIKING EXPLORER
  • SEA STORM
  • PS PEARL
  • COOL VOYAGER
  • COOL RUNNING
  • GLORIOUS SPLENDOUR
  • NORSEMAN II
  • STAR JING
  • MICHALE COMBIE MCCALL
  • NORSEMAN
  • JAMES DUNLAP
  • PRESIDENT
Photo credit: Fotolia

Monday, June 30, 2014

Amver ship saves 210 migrants

According to an email forwarded to the Amver center, the Amver participating ship Peruvian Reefer rescued 210 migrants on June 8, 2014.

The captain of the 452 foot reefer  noted in his email that the crew spotted two boats loaded with migrants in the Mediterranean Sea and immediately notified Italian rescue authorities.   Italian personnel instructed the captain and crew to attempt to rescue the migrants.

According to the ship's message, as the ship approached the second boat in distress the survivors were so anxious to be rescued they capsized their small boat and it sank. "Due to the capsizing two people went under water," the captain stated, "we immediately lowered a rescue boat but he current made the bodies drift away."

Once all the survivors were aboard the Bahamian flagged ship the crew provided first aid, food, water and took photos of every migrant for the Italian Coast Guard.

Italian authorities advised the crew of the reefer, which was hauling bananas to Libya, to sail to Sicily to disembark the survivors. Once the transfer of the survivors was made the Peruvian Reefer was released and continued on its voyage to discharge bananas.

The Peruvian Reefer, managed by NYK Cool of Japan, enrolled in Amver on April 6, 1997.

Photo credit: marinetraffic.com